Certain underlying conditions and the number of conditions were associated with severe COVID-19

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8/7/2021, 5:33:50 PM


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Per the CDC study, Certain underlying conditions and the number of conditions were associated with severe COVID-19 illness. Hypertension and disorders of lipid metabolism were the most frequent, whereas obesity, diabetes with complication, and anxiety disorders were the strongest risk factors for severe COVID-19 illness. Among 4,899,447 hospitalized US adults in the PHD-SR, 540,667 (11.0%) were hospitalized with COVID-19 in March 2021. Among patients hospitalized with COVID-19, 18 most frequent underlying conditions, of which 9 were associated with severe COVID-19 illness. These 9 conditions were both prevalent in the sample (affecting 81.9% of inpatients with COVID-19) and associated with severe COVID-19 illness, suggesting a high impact at the population level. Essential hypertension and disorders of lipid metabolism were the most frequent conditions, whereas obesity, anxiety and fear-related disorders, diabetes with complication, and CKD were the strongest risk factors for death among hospitalized patients with COVID-19 The results reinforce previous findings of higher risk of severe illness associated with diabetes with complication, obesity, coronary atherosclerosis and other heart disease chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and neurocognitive disorders

In this cross-sectional study of 540,667 adult hospitalized patients with COVID-19, 94.9% had at least 1 underlying medical condition. Hypertension and disorders of lipid metabolism were the most frequent, whereas obesity, diabetes with complication, anxiety disorders, and the total number of conditions were the strongest risk factors for severe COVID-19 illness.

One of the most interesting finding among risks were Anxiety and fear-related disorders as a prevalent condition in the sample; as they were also the second highest risk factor for death among the underlying conditions considered in the study https://www.cdc.gov/pcd/issues/2021/21_0123.htm